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put-that-in-barry:

I have never in my life seen this image photoshopped as the guy wanted it

put-that-in-barry:

I have never in my life seen this image photoshopped as the guy wanted it

(Source: 180mph, via unescapable)

When did you start believing in impossible heroes?

Don’t you know?

(Source: sirnovak, via david-tennants-little-fangirl)

sundxwn:

The Universe by Daniel Korzhonov

sundxwn:

The Universe by Daniel Korzhonov

(Source: sundxwn.tumbr.com)

cophines:

Doctor Who meme | eight planets/times [8/8]

Planet of the Ood

(via david-tennants-little-fangirl)

astronomicalwonders:

The Milky Way
This magnificent 360-degree panoramic image, covering the entire southern and northern celestial sphere, reveals the cosmic landscape that surrounds our tiny blue planet. This gorgeous starscape serves as the first of three extremely high-resolution images featured in the GigaGalaxy Zoom project, launched by ESO within the framework of the International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009). The plane of our Milky Way Galaxy, which we see edge-on from our perspective on Earth, cuts a luminous swath across the image. The projection used in GigaGalaxy Zoom place the viewer in front of our Galaxy with the Galactic Plane running horizontally through the image — almost as if we were looking at the Milky Way from the outside. From this vantage point, the general components of our spiral galaxy come clearly into view, including its disc, marbled with both dark and glowing nebulae, which harbours bright, young stars, as well as the Galaxy’s central bulge and its satellite galaxies. As filming extended over several months, objects from the Solar System came and went through the star fields, with bright planets such as Venus and Jupiter. For copyright reasons, we cannot provide here the full 800-million-pixel original image, which can be requested from Serge Brunier. The high resolution image provided here contains 18 million pixels.
Credit: ESO/S. Brunier

astronomicalwonders:

The Milky Way

This magnificent 360-degree panoramic image, covering the entire southern and northern celestial sphere, reveals the cosmic landscape that surrounds our tiny blue planet. This gorgeous starscape serves as the first of three extremely high-resolution images featured in the GigaGalaxy Zoom project, launched by ESO within the framework of the International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009). The plane of our Milky Way Galaxy, which we see edge-on from our perspective on Earth, cuts a luminous swath across the image. The projection used in GigaGalaxy Zoom place the viewer in front of our Galaxy with the Galactic Plane running horizontally through the image — almost as if we were looking at the Milky Way from the outside. From this vantage point, the general components of our spiral galaxy come clearly into view, including its disc, marbled with both dark and glowing nebulae, which harbours bright, young stars, as well as the Galaxy’s central bulge and its satellite galaxies. As filming extended over several months, objects from the Solar System came and went through the star fields, with bright planets such as Venus and Jupiter. For copyright reasons, we cannot provide here the full 800-million-pixel original image, which can be requested from Serge Brunier. The high resolution image provided here contains 18 million pixels.

Credit: ESO/S. Brunier

(via fuckyeah-stars)

The bank is now o p e n

(Source: flirtingcompanions, via doctorwho)

groovymuttations:

mood: tenzin without eyebrows

image

(Source: mako, via lanvie)

astronomicalwonders:

Reflections in the Orion Nebula - M78
This image of the reflection nebula Messier 78 was captured using the Wide Field Imager camera on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory, Chile. This colour picture was created from many monochrome exposures taken through blue, yellow/green and red filters, supplemented by exposures through a filter that isolates light from glowing hydrogen gas. 
Credit: ESO

astronomicalwonders:

Reflections in the Orion Nebula - M78

This image of the reflection nebula Messier 78 was captured using the Wide Field Imager camera on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory, Chile. This colour picture was created from many monochrome exposures taken through blue, yellow/green and red filters, supplemented by exposures through a filter that isolates light from glowing hydrogen gas.

Credit: ESO

(via thefrogman)

sundxwn:

Sand Tufas of Mono Lake by Celso Mollo

sundxwn:

Sand Tufas of Mono Lake by Celso Mollo

It doesn’t matter if there’s nothing under the bed or in the dark, so long as you know it’s okay to be afraid of it. So, listen. If you listen to nothing else, listen to this. You’re always going to be afraid, even if you learn to hide it. Fear is like a companion. A constant companion, always there. But that’s okay, because fear can bring us together. Fear can bring you home. I’m going to leave you something just so you’ll always remember… fear makes companions of us all.

(Source: rubyredwisp, via david-tennants-little-fangirl)

elenamorelli:

{ stars, little clouds and starkeh }

(via fuckyeah-stars)

(Source: winterfel, via david-tennants-little-fangirl)